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I’ve never figured out the WMA aversion to the SCA …It as if they Hold the hole society with contempt…. The mechanics for swinging a sword in the SCA are the pretty much the same in the historical context. Unless a man’s anatomy has changed …last time I checked it hadn’t.



While I don't practice WMA, I think I can perhaps lend a little perspective from a Japanese sword arts view of things. First is the fact that the WMA guys are still trying to forge an identity. Much of what they are doing is very similar to what the SCA has been doing for quite some time, so they are eager to differentiate themselves. Second, the goals are very different. The SCA goals (as I understand them, not being involved in it) are historically plausible reenactment, fighting, and having a good time. The goal of the WMA is more aligned with the goal of the koryu Japanese sword arts. Primary is preservation of tradition and attempting to understand what was handed down. Oh, and having a good time. Fighting ability is rarely even considered as any sort of goal.

Don't get me wrong, we all practice as if our lives depended on it in order to try and stay true to the training. However, the goal is to internalize the training (which takes quite a long time when it's only a hobby) in order to try and understand what our ancestors were trying to teach about swordsmanship. Eventually, the end result should be the same, a good swordsman.

Different methods and different ideas leads to cliques, and a lot of people have trouble accepting that something different can be just as good or meaningful. I see a lot of that in both the WMA and JSA circles.
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Paul