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#330970 - 07/11/08 12:59 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: Karate_Jutsu]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
I met Mr. Ray Flowers and studied under Mr. Oscar Adams in Lima, Ohio and went to school with Mr. Terry James, although he was a few years younger than me. I am Russ Conkle and live near Lima, Ohio.

From the original post, there are corrections to the statement of who taught who.

This is not correct ďRay Flowers taught Terry James, who taught Oscar Adams, who taught, Steven Williams, who taught my SenseisĒ

The truth is: Ray Flowers taught Oscar Adams Karate in Lima, Ohio in the earliest of the 1960s. Oscar Adams taught Terry James, who at that time was one of the youngest in the area to receive his black belt. Oscar taught several students who have taken the art to new levels of interpretation and understanding.

Ray Flowers was stationed in Korea during his military stay. That is where he learned his Eugue Ryu Karate. It was in a remote, once Japanese occupied area of Korea and was thus learned from a Japanese still living in the country. It was called Korean Karate, however, they used Japanese terms. I donít understand the mystery behind that and didnít ask.

Oscar Adams was also in the military. His first martial arts exposure was Judo. When he returned to the states he located in Lima, Ohio and studied Karate under Ray Flowers until Ray moved from the area to eastern Ohio. Oscar, who qualified for the 1964 Olympic trials was a dynamic individual who helped Eugue Ryu stay alive in the area and even expand to other states, including Kansas.
Oscar moved from Lima to Sidney where we owned a flight school together. His second wife later got a job with the Federal Aviation Agency and he moved first to New Mexico and then to Atlanta Georgia where he passed away in March of 2006.

Terry James was still in public school when he studied Karate from Oscar Adams. I donít believe he was ever in the military but was going to study to become a Chiropractor. Donít know if that ever happened. He briefly took over for Oscar and started a couple of other dojoís in nearby Ada and Bellefontaine until he pulled roots and moved to Kansas City.

Mr Steven William,ÖÖ I donít really know, but I would guess, his real learning came from Terry James and not Oscar.

Whatever any Karate style was, it had a beginning, even if you start it yourself. Eugue Ryu had a beginning in the United States with Ray Flowers and is what it is today. It has earned its place with state championships and many fine dedicated instructors who grow and share their knowledge. Ultimately your Karate, Judo, Music, Trade your life is yours in the end. You own your style.

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#330971 - 07/11/08 01:42 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: Chirogabe]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
Terry James - Russ Conkle here. Saw some mis-information in the original post. I submitted what I know since I met Ray Flowers, knew and studied with Oscar Adams and went to school with you. Where have you been? You should be able to share some information on this topic.

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#330972 - 07/11/08 01:47 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: Karate_Jutsu]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
Post this twice, but wanted it moved to a higher level

I met Mr. Ray Flowers and studied under Mr. Oscar Adams in Lima, Ohio and went to school with Mr. Terry James, although he was a few years younger than me. I am Russ Conkle and live near Lima, Ohio.

From the original post, there are corrections to the statement of who taught who.

This is not correct ďRay Flowers taught Terry James, who taught Oscar Adams, who taught, Steven Williams, who taught my SenseisĒ

The truth is: Ray Flowers taught Oscar Adams Karate in Lima, Ohio in the earliest of the 1960s. Oscar Adams taught Terry James, who at that time was one of the youngest in the area to receive his black belt. Oscar taught several students who have taken the art to new levels of interpretation and understanding.

Ray Flowers was stationed in Korea during his military stay. That is where he learned his Eugue Ryu Karate. It was in a remote, once Japanese occupied area of Korea and was thus learned from a Japanese still living in the country. It was called Korean Karate, however, they used Japanese terms. I donít understand the mystery behind that and didnít ask.

Oscar Adams was also in the military. His first martial arts exposure was Judo. When he returned to the states he located in Lima, Ohio and studied Karate under Ray Flowers until Ray moved from the area to eastern Ohio. Oscar, who qualified for the 1964 Olympic trials was a dynamic individual who helped Eugue Ryu stay alive in the area and even expand to other states, including Kansas.
Oscar moved from Lima to Sidney where we owned a flight school together. His second wife later got a job with the Federal Aviation Agency and he moved first to New Mexico and then to Atlanta Georgia where he passed away in March of 2006.

Terry James was still in public school when he studied Karate from Oscar Adams. I donít believe he was ever in the military but was going to study to become a Chiropractor. Donít know if that ever happened. He briefly took over for Oscar and started a couple of other dojoís in nearby Ada and Bellefontaine until he pulled roots and moved to Kansas City.

Mr Steven William,ÖÖ I donít really know, but I would guess, his real learning came from Terry James and not Oscar. I would have to talk with him to find out more.

Whatever any Karate style was, it had a beginning, even if you start it yourself. Eugue Ryu had a beginning in the United States with Ray Flowers and is what it is today. It has earned its place with state championships and many fine dedicated instructors who grow and share their knowledge. Ultimately your Karate, Judo, Music, Trade your life is yours in the end. You own your style.

Top
#330973 - 07/11/08 02:21 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: conklegr]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
I now see that Mr Steve Williams passed away only 16 days after Mr. Oscar Adam. I regret this in more ways than one; even though I did not personally know the man. Please see how much he was thought of and respected at http://www.budokaikarate.net/steve.html

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#428759 - 08/01/10 12:05 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: conklegr]
Singing Hawk Offline
Stranger

Registered: 07/31/10
Posts: 1
First time poster here... and a former practitioner of Eugue-Ryu.

I was a student in the Lima Eugue-Ryu dojo at the same time as conklegr, whose posts are found just above mine. (Hi, Russ... long time no see, brother! Dragons forever!!!)



My Senseis were Michael Young and Tony Haithcock- both trained by Oscar Adams.

From what I've read, Russ's timeline and instructional lineage is absolutely accurate- to the last detail.

To the poster named Ed Morris: you surmise well- but your timelines are a bit inaccurate. I was a student of Eugue-Ryu in the late 70's/early 80's, when Master Adams left the school in the capable hands of Senseis Micheal Young and Tony Haithcock. The dojo was run out of the basement of the local YMCA in my hometown, and the teachings that Mr. Adams brought to them was handed directly to us.

Terry James was well before my time. The only 'Terry' I remember was a young man by the name of Terry Sullivan, who studied from Oscar at the same time that Senseis Young and Haithcock were students. They all came up together in the ranks as Oscar's pupils, and all recieved their black belts within a couple years of each other. This would be in the mid- to late-1970's. Terry S. left Master Adams'dojo to start his own school a few years before I became a student. In our little town of Lima, Ohio, there were actually TWOEugue-Ryu-based scools running simultaneously. The Young/Haithcock dojo carried the Dragon crest, while the Sullivan dojo carried the Cobra crest.

Both dojos represented well in statewide and regional tournaments. Kumite was especially fierce when representatives of each school were paired off against each other in competition. It happened rarely, but I can still remember the electricity that surrounded those matches. Action elsewhere would come to a complete stop... and even a preliminary/semifinal round would command the attention of most attendees at the venue.

___________________

Regarding the poster T_Mullen, who stated: "This is an interesting discussion on, in my oppinion, one of the toughest and most complete styles ever. As those who are very familiar with Eugue Ryu can attest, if you can still walk without being wobbly after training then you did not train in Eugue Ryu."

I'll second that emotion... in spades. I'm in my early 50's now... and I can feel every lunge punch or hatchet kick that was ever administered upon me. And I don't regret a minute of the time I spent in study.

When I studied Eugue-Ryu, I was in my prime... early 20's, with boundless energy and a burning desire. I was hard, lean, and impervious to pain. I would limp from the dojo at least once or twice per week. Training was tough and unrelenting. Wall-mounted makis were replaced regularly. EVERY SINGLE SESSION ended with "full-contact challenges"... any student could challenge any other ranking student to full-contact kumite. Often, the classes would extend by 30-45 minutes from all the challenges laid down... orange belts fighting green belts, green belts fighting brown belts, students fighting teachers. The overwhelming atmosphere in the dojo was this: "We're all here to extend The Art... so let's each of us show what we know, what we can do, and what we can learn from each other."
We learned punches, kicks, blocks... and we learned judo/jujitsu throws and holds. Eugue-Ryu (as I learned it) was ablending/amalgam of martial arts styles that made it second-to-none in the world of self-defense.

In short- I was an an abassador of a martial artform that could hold its own against anything short of a bullet. If you can't find a Eugue-Ryu school, seek out a Shorin-Ryu or Ishin-Ryu school as a replacement.

I left those classes bloodied and bruised... but I also left with the knowlege that I could 'handle my business'... no matter what Life threw at me. And I can still handle myself, to this day... mentally, spiritually, and (to a slightly lesser extent)physically.

THAT'S what Eugue-Ryu did for me.

Today, I'm 53 years old. I have a 43+ inch chest, 15+-inch biceps, a 32-inch waist, and I still weigh 170. My last B.P. reading was 117/78... and I can still run down and overtake an average man who's 35 years of age, if I need to.

My time studying Eugue-Ryu was a magical time in my life, and taught me things about myself that I'm just now starting to learn.

Eugue-Ryu is the REAL DEAL. It is hard, it is all-out, full-contact... and it doesn't make excuses for "second best." Produce- or get carried off the mat by your fellow students.

That's Eugue-Rye. Hardass style- for a hardass world.

________________

Thanks to you all, for induging me in this long-winded first post. I've been storing it up for a good while now, and just had to let it out.



(p.s. Russell... I sure hope you remember me, because I sure remember you. You were one of the ultimate "hard hitters," Dogg... and I looked up to you as a mentor and friend. You spent extra time with me after class, and I'll always revere you for your efforts. In class, I was known as 'Bobby'... Tony's cousin. [Big 'fro, light skin, orange belt... big bro to Grant Dunn, and best friend to his Mom, Ruth Ann]... remember me now?)

Eugue-Ryu is the real deal.

Loveya, Oscar Adams... Womb2Tomb.

I'll seeya soon. Until then,... whip My Pops into shape, willya? Can't wait to kumite with My Old Man- in that Great Dojo In The Sky.

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#428879 - 08/05/10 10:16 PM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: Singing Hawk]
kenposan Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 08/23/01
Posts: 633
Loc: Columbus, Ohio
Hey, fellow Ohioans.

I lived in Lima for many years and studied Okinawa Kenpo under Eric Shellenbarger and Malcolm Baker (and the others).

Anyway, as an outsider to Eugue-Ryu, I can say Haithcock had a great reputation. A friend of mine knew him and another friend had his kid in the Y classes. Tony was a class act from what I hear.
_________________________
The angry man will defeat himself in battle, as well as in life. -Samurai maxim

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#430006 - 09/17/10 01:36 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: kenposan]
cronarct Offline
Stranger

Registered: 09/17/10
Posts: 1
Hello, first let me introduce myself, my name is Darren, i am currently an Eugue Ryu KarateJutso student under Sensei Shane Topp, who was triained by Sensei Michael Young who was trained by Oscar Adams... anyways im just glad i found some ppl online who are eugue ryu pratitioners, and i agree fully with what some ppl have posted about how it is a TRUE form, one of the hardest to train in and also the whole leaving the dojo beaten battered and bruised... im currently going through that! and i couldnt enjoy it more, and the true satisfaction is knowing that if need be i can handle myself in a situation because of the intense training i endure! im currently an orange belt hopeing for blue sometime within the next 2-3 months if i can manage it... also here is a link to Sensei Topp's dojo website http://jukidokai.com/hombodojo/

well i can go on for days and days chatting about Eugue Ryu and other martial arts but it is late so hopefully this thread isnt dead and i get some sort of reply soon!

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#430280 - 10/02/10 01:36 PM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: cronarct]
kolslaw Offline
Stranger

Registered: 09/12/10
Posts: 1
Its pretty wild seeing a forum regarding "Eugue Ryu". I trained in this style under Terry James when I was a teen back in the early 80's in Bellefontaine OH. Terry was a huge role model for me at a time in my life when I didn't have many to choose from. He was always kind but firm. He tested me for my yellow and orange belt. I was suppose to be tested for my blue but Terry left town. My uncle and myself showed up one night for class and the doors where locked. That was probably one of the worst days of my life. Never heard what happened and have always wondered for all these years why he left without saying bye. Oh well, I'm glad to hear that the style is alive and well. Its a great art and perfect for young men and women to receive some self dicipline in thier lives.

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#431261 - 01/02/11 11:45 AM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: kolslaw]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
Sorry of your experience with the Dojo closing so unexpected when you were a teen. Arts like Eugue-Rye, Judo and more have helped carve the character of some fine boys, and girls, men, and women. If you are still in the Bellefontaine area there are other schools in that area, but are of different styles. You might want to look around. San Wazi, was one art I knew of in Bellefontaine. Can't tell you much about it, but a young man was teaching there. Look up Tim Sutton, I am sure he would share information about that style. You are always welcome to the Lima YMCA for Judo or check out Shane Topp's Eugue-Rye school in Wapakoneta http://jukidokai.com/hombodojo/

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#431262 - 01/02/11 12:04 PM Re: Eugue Ryu [Re: conklegr]
conklegr Offline
Newbie

Registered: 11/18/07
Posts: 6
Ok Ok. Happy fingers on the keyboard. Style referenced should have been Eugue Ryu (not Rye). Wow. Guess martial arts people really are human. I still enjoy this forum and everyone who has contributed. Keep in touch.

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