FightingArts Estore
Pressure Points
From a medical professional, straight facts on where and how to hit that can save your life.
Stretching
Limber or not, anyone can add height and speed to their kicks with this method.
Calligraphy
For yourself or as a gift, calligraphy is special, unique and lasting.
Karate Uniforms
Look your best. Max snap. low cost & superior crafted: “Peak Performance Gold” 16 oz uniforms.

MOTOBU
Classic book translation. Hard to find. Not in stores.
Who's Online
0 registered (), 60 Guests and 1 Spider online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Shanktotheright, royal, bobgalle100011, agenonline, TooNice
22862 Registered Users
Top Posters (30 Days)
THEFOREVERMAN 3
Dobbersky 3
MattJ 2
royal 2
SoulJah22 1
April
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
New Topics
Judo Olympic Games 1964 Tokyo, The Video Gallery
by ergees
04/01/14 05:26 AM
Muay Thai Seminar with Greg Nelson - Marcus Charle
by Marcus Charles
03/24/14 04:39 PM
Fighting On Saturday!!!
by Dobbersky
03/20/14 05:45 AM
Where Are They Now?
by Dobbersky
05/30/13 08:08 AM
AKK kata question
by
09/04/05 01:27 PM
Recent Posts
Fighting On Saturday!!!
by THEFOREVERMAN
Yesterday at 08:22 AM
Muay Thai Seminar with Greg Nelson - Marcus Charle
by THEFOREVERMAN
Yesterday at 08:20 AM
AKK kata question
by MattJ
04/04/14 05:45 PM
Judo Olympic Games 1964 Tokyo, The Video Gallery
by ergees
04/01/14 05:26 AM
Forum Stats
22862 Members
36 Forums
35546 Topics
432378 Posts

Max Online: 424 @ 09/24/13 10:38 PM
Topic Options
#112613 - 08/05/04 03:47 PM Paul Chen Broadsword
Anonymous
Unregistered


Does anyone here own a Paul Chen broadsword, or even used one? I have to buy one soon for my Kung Fu class, and am not sure which one to buy. I like the Cold Steel ones, but they are a bit out of my budget.
I am having a bit of trouble finding reviews, and opinions about broadswords because it seems most people prefer Japanese swords. I would appreciate any information given.
Thank you!

Top
#112614 - 08/06/04 05:57 PM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
javaman Offline
Member

Registered: 07/04/03
Posts: 179
Loc: calgary, alberta, canada
I own both the Paul chen practical chinese broadsword and the Paul Chen Water song (the red flexible chinese broadsword). These are both superb swords for the money you pay.

I use the flexible one when learning new forms or practicing complicated, dexterous handwork, or when doing any tricks with my sword (just for fun). It's safer and lighter and easier to handle.

I use the black model (the stiff, heavier one) for forms I know well enough to be confident I won't mess up and hurt myself. This sword when you buy it comes dull, but not really 'blunt' it could cut someone badly if you hit them with it. The tip on it also comes to such a fine point that it would easily pierce flesh and even bone if you stabbed with it, or dropped it tip first on your foot or something.

I also own another, second-hand Paul Chen kung fu broadsword, that I customized by polishing the blade to a fine finish, grinding a 4-inch (10 cm) blunt section to the ricassa (the area where the edge meets the gaurd); And sharpening the rest of the blade to a razors edge with a diamond sharpener. I don't use this one for forms, or practice, I use it to test my cutting skills. And to prove to all the people I meet who say that Paul chen uses bad steel, that they are dead wrong. I once cleanly cut a free-hanging ham quarter in two, with only one swing of this sword, bone and all. Boy that was fun. And it made all the people present who thought reproduction swords and any sword that isn't hand forged **** , step back and take notice.

You should ask your instructor which sword you should get; the flexible one or the stiff one, and then make your decision. These are both great swords for kung fu practice. One thing about the Cold Steel ones, is that they come razor sharp when you order them, not the thing you want for practice. I would advise against them.

I bought both my swords from this e-bay store: It's called "Grendels Cave" and they have fair prices, good shipping and a great selection of the non-japanese Paul Chen models. If you live in the U.S or Canada, this is a great place to buy from.
http://stores.ebay.com/GRENDELS-CAVE-SWO...displayZ2QQtZkm

Top
#112615 - 08/08/04 10:48 PM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks for your answer. It has been very hard finding any review on these broadswords.

For my class I will have to get a practical one. I was looking at both those swords, and also the dao. http://www.imperialweapons.com/oriental/swords/20chidrag.html
I am not sure weather I want the dao, or the practical broadsword yet. I was thinking of getting the water song for practice, and you have just made up my mind.

I knew the cold steel ones came razor sharp. That is one reason for me holding off buying one. The other was money. I dont want to loose a limb while practicing.

The ebay store is nice, thanks for the link. I think I will buy the water song tonight, that is if my bank will allow..

Top
#112616 - 08/08/04 11:17 PM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
Anonymous
Unregistered


Do you have any tips on taking care of these swords? I have never owned a real sword before. Only wooden ones. Can I take care of them like a gun, just with a good layer of oil?

Top
#112617 - 08/09/04 03:58 PM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
javaman Offline
Member

Registered: 07/04/03
Posts: 179
Loc: calgary, alberta, canada
To take care of these swords, when you first get them give the blade a wipe down with cloth and some water and dish soap. This will remove any oil and debris they will have on them when you first get them. Then wipe it down with just a wet cloth to rinse the soap off of the blade.

Dry the blade and then put on a thin layer of mineral oil, but on the blade only. You dont need to oil the metal on the handgaurd or the pommel; If you do that, it will be extremely hard to grip it with a slippery oiled up handle.

The reason you want to first get the factory oil off is because it is more than likely not the same oil as you will be using, and it's best not to mix oils on a blade. It won't hurt the blade, but the undercoating of factory oil will prevent the mineral oil you put on from sticking to the blade, so it will just drip off when you practice.

Also with these swords I've found that about once every two months, if you use it for practice a lot, the handle, which is cloth wrapped, gets slick from dried sweat and harder to grip. When this happens I clean the handle with a rag, some hot water and a little bit of laundry detergent dissolved in the water, then I rinse the handle under a faucet and towel pat dry with a towel then I leave the sword laying in the sun; or by a heater duct in the winter to finish drying the handle. Using this cleaning method there had been no wear and tear on the cotton wraps of the handle in the nearly three years I have used my sword at least three times a week for hard practice.

Top
#112618 - 11/20/04 01:16 PM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
Anonymous
Unregistered


[QUOTE]Originally posted by javaman:
I own both the Paul chen practical chinese broadsword and the Paul Chen Water song (the red flexible chinese broadsword). These are both superb swords for the money you pay.

I use the flexible one when learning new forms or practicing complicated, dexterous handwork, or when doing any tricks with my sword (just for fun). It's safer and lighter and easier to handle.

I use the black model (the stiff, heavier one) for forms I know well enough to be confident I won't mess up and hurt myself. This sword when you buy it comes dull, but not really 'blunt' it could cut someone badly if you hit them with it. The tip on it also comes to such a fine point that it would easily pierce flesh and even bone if you stabbed with it, or dropped it tip first on your foot or something.

I also own another, second-hand Paul Chen kung fu broadsword, that I customized by polishing the blade to a fine finish, grinding a 4-inch (10 cm) blunt section to the ricassa (the area where the edge meets the gaurd); And sharpening the rest of the blade to a razors edge with a diamond sharpener. I don't use this one for forms, or practice, I use it to test my cutting skills. And to prove to all the people I meet who say that Paul chen uses bad steel, that they are dead wrong. I once cleanly cut a free-hanging ham quarter in two, with only one swing of this sword, bone and all. Boy that was fun. And it made all the people present who thought reproduction swords and any sword that isn't hand forged **** , step back and take notice.

You should ask your instructor which sword you should get; the flexible one or the stiff one, and then make your decision. These are both great swords for kung fu practice. One thing about the Cold Steel ones, is that they come razor sharp when you order them, not the thing you want for practice. I would advise against them.

I bought both my swords from this e-bay store: It's called "Grendels Cave" and they have fair prices, good shipping and a great selection of the non-japanese Paul Chen models. If you live in the U.S or Canada, this is a great place to buy from.
http://stores.ebay.com/GRENDELS-CAVE-SWO...displayZ2QQtZkm

[/QUOTE]
The Water Song sword I just received has an amazingly thin blade that behaves more like a whip than a sword . It also seems like it can be bent and not return to it's original shape -- though I haven't tried that. Also doesn't have any brand or mfg markings. I bought it after reading your review, but not from grendels. I'm wondering whether I have a knockoff. Is there anyway I can tell for sure. In any case I prefer my wood practice sword or my heavy weapon sword to this Water Song. I'd appreciate any help because the descriptions I've read sound exactly what I want but not what I got.
thanks,
taichisl

Top
#112619 - 11/22/04 07:41 AM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
Anonymous
Unregistered


I bought both the watersong sword, and the kung fu dao. Neither have markings. I would say that you more than likely have the real thing. Maybe someone else knows for sure how to tell.

Top
#112620 - 11/25/04 12:29 AM Re: Paul Chen Broadsword
javaman Offline
Member

Registered: 07/04/03
Posts: 179
Loc: calgary, alberta, canada
taichisl
The watersong sword is supposed to be extremely thin, and it has the no markings that identify it as a paul chen sword.

I'm sorry I didn't specifically mention that it is extremely thin, but I assumed that was listed in any description for it on any website that offered it for sale or any catalog that sold it.

I would guess that you did recieve the proper sword, although I would be suspicious if it was marked down significantly from what Grendels or other reputable online dealers sell it for.

Kung fu swords are made extra thin for added quickness and to make that cool sound when they are used. Very few sifus teach with proper (i.e realistic for killing) weighted-swords. Sword fights don't happen anymore, so kung fu training is usually geared more towards forms and asthetics than for using historically acurate or practical techniques (with swords anyway). I myself find no problem with that as long the practioner KNOWS whether the techniques he/she is learning would be practical in a real sword fight or not.

Top


Moderator:  Charles Mahan, Cord, MattJ, Reiki 




Action Ads
1.5 Million Plus Page Views
Monthly
Only $89
Details

Ryukyu Art
Artifacts from the Ryukyu Kingdom missing since WWII. Visit www.ShisaLion.Org to view pictures

Best Stun Guns
Self Defense Products-stun guns, pepper spray, tasers and more

Surveillance 4U
Complete surveillance systems for covert operations or secure installation security

Asylum Images
Book presents photo tour of the Trans-Allegany Lunatic Asylum. A must if you're going to take a ghost tour!

 



Unbreakable Unbrella

krav maga