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#220800 - 01/09/06 10:37 AM Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S....
bin Offline
Member

Registered: 01/04/06
Posts: 169
Loc: NJ, USA
In Korea, I know for a fact that most Taekwondo practitioners are elementary school children. Why is that? Why did that happen? Hapkido in Korea still has a large adult audience and is a traditional art just like TKD. In Korea, why have a lot of older teenagers, young adults, and adults turned away from their national martial art? It' mostly kids. If anyone could give me a reason, it'd be greatly appreciated.


Secondly, what about the U.S.? Does Taekwondo have a large adult and young adult audience in the U.S.? Is TKD in the U.S. more popular among kids?


What about other nations?

Thanks

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#220801 - 01/09/06 12:49 PM Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: bin]
Dereck Offline
Prolific

Registered: 10/04/04
Posts: 10413
Loc: Great White North
Don't quote me on this but the Taekwondo taught has Hapkido blended with it. Not the whole teachings but a lot of it. My Instructor's own Instructor is from South Korea and as a youth he was taught both together and this is how he teaches it. So this mean you have all of the aspects of Taekwondo but you also have throws, takedowns, grappling and self defense.

I've heard my Instructor talk about things told to him from his Instructor. As Taekwondo is a national thing it is taught in school. Many after school don't go further with it but those that do either compete or as with my Instructor's Instructor joined their military and eventually taught it to the Korean and US Marines. Again this was a combination of Taekwondo and Hapkido.

In the US and Canada I would say that Taekwondo has a huge following for both children and adults ... but probably more children. Taekwondo in North America is one of the largest growing martial arts. As for other nations I could not say.
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#220802 - 01/10/06 09:50 PM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: bin]
TeK9 Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 12/22/05
Posts: 2257
Loc: Northern California, USA
I would say it is because hapiko is a more complete self defense system. ANd the natiional martial art of Korea is also a national sport. This makes empahsis on training and sparring. They are trying to build athletes. Which is probably harder for aduts to become unless they have already been trainging since an early age. But in Korea there are still tradtional forms of TKD which are tuaght just like karate.

Derrick, did I mention I am taking Hapkido now woot woot. So far I like everything except the kicks, I think I'll keep my TKD kicks.
_________________________
"Poor is the pupil who
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master" - Leonardo Da
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#220803 - 01/11/06 12:24 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: TeK9]
Dereck Offline
Prolific

Registered: 10/04/04
Posts: 10413
Loc: Great White North
TeK9, I read this on another thread, good for you. How are the kicks different? As mine is a blended system I suspect our kicks our TKD ... but then I have nothing really to compare it to. I don't want to derail this thread but others may be interested as well. I'd like to hear so. Or direct me to another thread. I can't remember which one it is called so if you remind me then I will go there and see it. Thanks
_________________________
"IF I COME ... I'M BRINGING THE PAIN WITH ME"

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#220804 - 01/11/06 12:33 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S.... [Re: bin]
ericsams Offline
Newbie

Registered: 01/10/06
Posts: 6
In my dojang we have a lot of youg poeple , more that adults but being an adult myself I like doing TKD. Our stlye is mixed TKD,Hapkido,judoand Ki training. We also do Yoga at the end of class. We do not learn traditional TKD we fight from the boxer stance versus the horse. I can't say which is better or worse, I just think our style makes sense.

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#220805 - 01/11/06 02:42 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: Dereck]
Sushi Offline
Member

Registered: 11/23/05
Posts: 93
Loc: Germany
Quote:


As Taekwondo is a national thing it is taught in school.
In the US and Canada I would say that Taekwondo has a huge following for both children and adults ... but probably more children. Taekwondo in North America is one of the largest growing martial arts. As for other nations I could not say.



Basic is that for young children you only have three options of martial arts to start with and a lot of children at the age of 7 (minimum age) like cool stuff like Bruce lee, Jet LI, or others..
So it is Karate (mostly Shotokan as Kyoshonkay is too hard) Judo or Taekwondo. Karate is very traditonal in basics and it takes at least one year to go from belt to belt, that is not very positive for childeren (and their parents) secondly Judo which is not perfect for very active kids who like kicking and stuff. So Taekwondo is the only option for them.
an example for Germany.
There are let us say 50 children who started with taekwondo at the age of 7-8 .
As the first belts up to 6.KUP (green) are quite easy to achieve they mostly stay with it for two years. After green belt it is getting more challanging and so a lot of them quit. So you still have let us say 20 who achieve blue belt at the age of 10-11.
Some of them change schools to (high school??) now and this is getting harder, so their parents donīt let them continue.
So there is a rest of maybe 10 who will achieve 1. Kup (red with black tap) at the age of let us say 13. Now some of them are more interested in Computers and girls and stuff and they are not going for a challenge of black belt. So it is maybe 5 left who go for black - belt.
So at the age of 16 and having achieved black belt, many quit after a while.
Those who do tournament-sparring, and change classes to grown-ups in fighting - tournaments will get frustrated and many of them stop. So out of 50 there stay maybe two who will be exprienced fighters.
From the 48 which had quit, some 4-5 will come back to Taeksondo some day and go for tradtional schools or patterns.
That is my experience for Germany.

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#220806 - 01/11/06 07:36 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: Dereck]
TeK9 Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 12/22/05
Posts: 2257
Loc: Northern California, USA
hehe derrick I've only had one, four hour class. I cant really go to an extent here. But I did pick up the difference in one kick. My instructor did a spinning heal kick to my stomach. The only way I can discribe it is as a "wheel kick"
he spun on his left foot and pivited clock wise to spin and hit me with his right heel. Now he kept his kicking leg extended so I saw that sucker coming from a mile away.

He told me that was a classic hapkido kick and that it's one of the basic that hapkido is known for. This kick was used as part of a striking technique.

He had me throw a rear punch, he then blocked wih a knife hand while side stepping into a back stance and then spinning and hitting me with a wheel kick. Followed by an arm throw.

In modern TKD we would never throw a low spinning heel kick, we only throw those high durring sparring. We prefer a more direct apprach like a back kick.

In modern/sport tkd a back kick is a kick done while turning/spiing, while in tradtional tkd this would be called a spinning side kick. We generally throw these to the stomach unless in competition some people throw them to the face, looks fancier.

Anyway I prefer to do a back kick over a (hapkido)spinning wheel kick.

Oh by the way in Traditional TKD a spinning back kick is really a spinning side kick. Meaning the kickers knee goes out making look like a regular side kick, once you complete the turn you ten extend your leg to kick. Unfortunetly this however, leaves the family jewls exposed. OUCH!

So moder tkd has changed it so you can do this kick a bit faster with more power but with slightly less control. Instead of chamber our knee out, we dont chamber at all, we simply spinning and kick out. A perfect example of a moder tkd back kick would be like looking at a horse. They kick straight back and so do we. Yeeha, ride'em cowboy.
_________________________
"Poor is the pupil who
does not surpass his
master" - Leonardo Da
Vinci

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#220807 - 01/11/06 10:19 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S.... [Re: bin]
Taison Offline
The Forum Dragon
Professional Poster

Registered: 09/06/05
Posts: 3629
Loc: BKK, Thailand
Maybe you want a little info from Thailand?

Most kids in Thailand who can afford goes TKD until they reach green. Then it gets challenging and they quit.

Poorer children usually start MT until the age of 16 and then goes TKD. They usually become pro and gets trained for competition like SEA games or Olympics. The commitee forgot one thing though. . . TKD sport is about fancy and points. Being tougher and stronger won't give you points.

Now, about adults? Well, most old Thai people are to negative about foreign arts. They say Judo is uncivilized and TKD to be dancing. That is until I had to show them that a leg-lock/arm-bar could win over ANY MT figher. As for TKD, I'm not trained in it so I couldn't prove them wrong.

-Taison out
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I got two fists.. Don't make me use my head as well!

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#220808 - 01/11/06 10:56 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S.... [Re: bin]
onb Offline
Member

Registered: 05/10/05
Posts: 246
Loc: Canada
Bin,

With regards to ages, what I've found in my club is that we get a lot of kids joining early as an afterschool activity to keep them active and stuff... often though, the parents join at the same time or a couple months later because it looks fun, has a lot of exercise and it gives them a positive activity to do with their children. Eventually, it seems that the kids get bored, distracted, or have to focus more on school so they quit but the parents continue to come and train. So in fact, we may have a larger adult group than kids ( about 60:40)... or at least, the adults have more staying power.

onb

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#220809 - 01/11/06 03:21 PM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: onb]
Dereck Offline
Prolific

Registered: 10/04/04
Posts: 10413
Loc: Great White North
Sushi

Your explanation fits ours as well. Kids get interested in too many other activities and then move on … my daughter was one. Very few kids will stick around unless there is something really exciting but only a small minority of children/juniors feels that excitement.






TeK9

Your explanation sounds like our "back roundhouse". It starts like a back kick; the head turns followed by a kick extended straight back, turning of hips and then the heel comes through the target. I'm not sure if this sounds more like our kick or their kick. This kick is one of my favorites and sometimes I over use it as I'll strike with more traditional kicks such as the roundhouse or front kick and then follow this up with one or more of these. I also like the back kick and like to do the ones at close range where you turn and switch feet fast and kick one off.

Knife hand techniques are quite commonly used in our self defense practices and I even taught the colored belts on Friday for the last part of the class an 8 strike hand pattern that we do. This comes more from our Hapkido influence. As are the throws though now with JJJ and BJJ in our repertoire it is hard to see where one begins and one ends.

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#220810 - 01/13/06 09:45 AM Re: Taekwondo practitioners' ages in Korea and U.S [Re: Dereck]
bin Offline
Member

Registered: 01/04/06
Posts: 169
Loc: NJ, USA
Well what I wanted to know was, how come children GREATLY outnumber adults and young adults that do TKD in Korea. In U.S. it's pretty balanced but not a lot of adults in Korea do TKD.

Why is that? It used to be so popular among everyone there, but the adult audience is fading. Why?

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