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#349783 - 07/05/07 12:53 AM Police Interrogation
ExCon Offline
There is no plan C

Registered: 03/02/07
Posts: 203
Should you have the need to defend yourself, dealing with the police afterward can be more important to your well being that the initial assault which you defended yourself from.

This article courtesy of how stuff works is to show the ploys used by the police to convict you. But with knowledge of the interrogator's games comes a massive psychological advantage to help you through your time in police custody.

Common Interrogation Techniques

Modern interrogation is a study in human nature. Most of us are more likely to talk to people who appear to be like us. Once we start talking, it's hard for us to stop. Once we start telling the truth, it's harder to start lying. When a police officer tells us our fingerprints were found on the inside doorknob of a home that was robbed two days ago, we get nervous, even if we wore gloves the whole time we were inside.
With a few exceptions, the police are allowed to lie to a suspect to get him to confess. The belief is that an innocent person would never confess to a crime she didn't commit, even if she were confronted with false physical evidence of her involvement. Unfortunately, that's not always the case (more on false confessions in the next section), but it's a big part of the reason why the police are allowed to employ deceptive tactics in interrogation.

The psychological manipulation begins before the interrogator even opens his mouth. The physical layout of an interrogation room is designed to maximize a suspect's discomfort and sense of powerlessness from the moment he steps inside. The classic interrogation manual "Criminal Interrogation and Confessions" recommends a small, soundproof room with only three chairs (two for detectives, one for the suspect) and a desk, with nothing on the walls. This creates a sense of exposure, unfamiliarity and isolation, heightening the suspect's "get me out of here" sensation throughout the interrogation.



The manual also suggests that the suspect should be seated in an uncomfortable chair, out of reach of any controls like light switches or thermostats, furthering his discomfort and setting up a feeling of dependence. A one-way mirror is an ideal addition to the room, because it increases the suspect's anxiety and allows other detectives to watch the process and help the interrogator figure out which techniques are working and which aren't.

Before the nine steps of the Reid interrogation begin, there's an initial interview to determine guilt or innocence. During this time, the interrogator attempts to develop a rapport with the suspect, using casual conversation to create a non-threatening atmosphere. People tend to like and trust people who are like them, so the detective may claim to share some of the suspect's interests or beliefs. If the suspect starts talking to the interrogator about harmless things, it becomes harder to stop talking (or start lying) later when the discussion turns to the crime



During this initial conversation, the detective observes the suspect's reactions -- both verbal and non-verbal -- to establish a baseline reaction before the real stress begins. The detective will use this baseline later as a comparison point.

One method of creating a baseline involves asking questions that cause the suspect to access different parts of his brain. The detective asks non-threatening questions that require memory (simple recall) and questions that require thinking (creativity). When the suspect is remembering something, his eyes will often move to the right. This is just an outward manifestation of his brain activating the memory center. When he's thinking about something, his eyes might move upward or to the left, reflecting activation of the cognitive center. The detective makes a mental note of the suspect's eye activity.

The next step is to turn the questioning to the task at hand. The detective will ask basic questions about the crime and compare the suspect's reactions to the baseline to determine if the suspect is being truthful or deceptive. If the interrogator asks the suspect where he was the night of the crime and he answers truthfully, he'll be remembering, so his eyes may move to the right; if he's making up an alibi, he's thinking, so his eyes might move to the left. If the interrogator determines that the suspect's reactions indicate deception, and all other evidence points to guilt, the interrogation of a guilty suspect begins.

The Reid technique is the basis of the widely used "Criminal Interrogation and Confessions" manual we already mentioned. It lays out nine steps or issues guiding interrogation. Many of these steps overlap, and there is no such thing as a "typical" interrogation; but the Reid technique provides a blueprint of how a successful interrogation might unfold.


Confrontation
The detective presents the facts of the case and informs the suspect of the evidence against him. This evidence might be real, or it might be made up. The detective typically states in a confident manner that the suspect is involved in the crime. The suspect's stress level starts increasing, and the interrogator may move around the room and invade the suspect's personal space to increase the discomfort.



If the suspect starts fidgeting, licking his lips and or grooming himself (running his hand through his hair, for instance), the detective takes these as indicators of deception and knows he's on the right track.

Theme development
The interrogator creates a story about why the suspect committed the crime. Theme development is about looking through the eyes of the suspect to figure out why he did it, why he'd like to think he did it and what type of excuse might make him admit he did it. Does the suspect use any particular mode of reasoning more often than others? For example, does he seem willing to blame the victim? The detective lays out a theme, a story, that the suspect can latch on to in order to either excuse or justify his part in the crime, and the detective then observes the suspect to see if he likes the theme. Is he paying closer attention than before? Nodding his head? If so, the detective will continue to develop that theme; if not, he'll pick a new theme and start over. Theme development is in the background throughout the interrogation. When developing themes, the interrogator speaks in a soft, soothing voice to appear non-threatening and to lull the suspect into a false sense of security.

Stopping denials
Letting the suspect deny his guilt will increase his confidence, so the detective tries to interrupt all denials, sometimes telling the suspect it'll be his turn to talk in a moment, but right now, he needs to listen. From the start of the interrogation, the detective watches for denials and stops the suspect before he can voice them. In addition to keeping the suspect's confidence low, stopping denials also helps quiet the suspect so he doesn't have a chance to ask for a lawyer. If there are no denials during theme development, the detective takes this as a positive indicator of guilt. If initial attempts at denial slow down or stop during theme development, the interrogator knows he has found a good theme and that the suspect is getting closer to confessing.

Overcoming objections
Once the interrogator has fully developed a theme that the suspect can relate to, the suspect may offer logic-based objections as opposed to simple denials, like "I could never rape somebody -- my sister was raped and I saw how much pain it caused. I would never do that to someone." The detective handles these differently than he does denials, because these objections can give him information to turn around and use against the suspect. The interrogator might say something like, "See, that's good, you're telling me you would never plan this, that it was out of your control. You care about women like your sister -- it was just a one-time mistake, not a recurring thing." If the detective does his job right, an objection ends up looking more like an admission of guilt.

Getting the suspect's attention
At this point, the suspect should be frustrated and unsure of himself. He may be looking for someone to help him escape the situation. The interrogator tries to capitalize on that insecurity by pretending to be the suspect's ally. He'll try to appear even more sincere in his continued theme development, and he may get physically closer to the suspect to make it harder for the suspect to detach from the situation. The interrogator may offer physical gestures of camaraderie and concern, such as touching the suspect's shoulder or patting his back.



The suspect loses resolve
If the suspect's body language indicates surrender -- his head in his hands, his elbows on his knees, his shoulders hunched -- the interrogator seizes the opportunity to start leading the suspect into confession. He'll start transitioning from theme development to motive alternatives (see the next step) that force the suspect to choose a reason why he committed the crime. At this stage, the interrogator makes every effort to establish eye contact with the suspect to increase the suspect's stress level and desire to escape. If, at this point, the suspect cries, the detective takes this as a positive indicator of guilt.

Alternatives
The interrogator offers two contrasting motives for some aspect of the crime, sometimes beginning with a minor aspect so it's less threatening to the suspect. One alternative is socially acceptable ("It was a crime of passion"), and the other is morally repugnant ("You killed her for the money"). The detective builds up the contrast between the two alternatives until the suspect gives an indicator of choosing one, like a nod of the head or increased signs of surrender. Then, the detective speeds things up.

Bringing the suspect into the conversation
Once the suspect chooses an alternative, the confession has begun. The interrogator encourages the suspect to talk about the crime and arranges for at least two people to witness the confession. One may be the second detective in room, and another may be brought in for the purpose of forcing the suspect to confess to a new detective -- having to confess to a new person increases the suspect's stress level and his desire to just sign a statement and get out of there. Bringing a new person into the room also forces the suspect to reassert his socially acceptable reason for the crime, reinforcing the idea that the confession is a done deal.



The confession
The final stage of an interrogation is all about getting the confession admitted at trial. The interrogator will have the suspect write out his confession or state it on videotape. The suspect is usually willing to do anything at this point to escape the interrogation. The suspect confirms that his confession is voluntary, not coerced, and signs the statement in front of witnesses.
It should be noted here that if, at any point during the interrogation, the suspect does somehow manage to ask for a lawyer or invoke his right to silence, the interrogation has to stop immediately. That's why it's so important to interrupt the suspect's attempts to speak in the initial stages -- if he invokes his rights, the interrogation is over.

The steps we've laid out here represent some of the psychological techniques that detectives use to get confessions from suspects. But a real interrogation doesn't always follow the textbook. Next, let's take a look at an actual police interrogation that ended with an admissible confession.

When You've Got Company
The Just Cause Law Collective warns that if you're arrested with friends, you've got to keep a cool head. Decide beforehand that no one's going to say a word until everyone has a lawyer, and remind yourself that police will try to play on the natural paranoia that arises when people are separated. The Collective offers a further warning regarding a group arrest: When you have your strategy discussion, don't do it in the back seat of a police car. If the officers stuffed you all into one car and walked away, they're recording you.

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#349784 - 07/05/07 04:47 AM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: ExCon]
Cord Offline
Prolific

Registered: 01/13/05
Posts: 11399
Loc: Cambridge UK.
Of course the other option, if you have truly defended yourself from attack, is to refuse to be interviewed without legal representation present (which is your right), and then, when the interview does happen, speak clearly and truthfully, detailing exactly what you experienced. Whilst doing this, your attacker will also be being interviewed, and to make themselves appear innocent, they will have to lie. the police have a lot of experience with liars, and from the two conflicting stories that transpire, along with CCTV footage/witness statements, a picture of the events will transpire, and appropriate action be taken from there.
The police are not 'out to get you' as an individual, they want to arrest the guilty party- its not personal.
I have had to give incident details to police on numerous occassions, even had 2 complaints made against me for my conduct ejecting people from work. in every case, I was honest (easy to do, i had done nothing wrong), and no further action was taken. at no point did I get the 'good cop-bad cop' routine, no one said 'next time mate, next time ' as I left the station. It was not personal. It was routine- filling in forms, giving statement, checking against witness reports, being let home with no charges.

if you need 'tactics' to deal with the police, maybe ask yourself 'am i innocent of the crime, or just trying to avoid punishment?'
_________________________
Don't let the door hit ya' where the good lord split ya'
http://cord.mybrute.com

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#349785 - 07/05/07 09:17 AM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: Cord]
harlan Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 07/31/04
Posts: 6664
Loc: Amherst, MA
Cord, can I ask a question? Putting aside the 'bad apples', do you think that the police in every country, and every state are trained to respond and interrogate in a uniform and professional manner?

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#349786 - 07/05/07 10:31 AM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: ExCon]
Neko456 Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 01/18/05
Posts: 3260
Loc: Midwest City, Ok, USA
Thats some good advice ask for your Lawyer. Answer all the personal Id questions so it looks like you are playing alone. Look out for the games they play "Good cop, bad cop" or the "Angry cop I know you did it, confuse play".

Really if they arrest you for defending yourself you are in pretty deep do do, somewhere you went too far. There were witnesses or camera. Or your story don't jive unless it was someone they know this is a lot of paper work unless the guy dies. A Hospital stay usually if theres no open gashes or signs of repeated beaten its tough just luck for the thug.

If it does happen every statement should start with, "I feared for my life, he threaten and laid hands on me in a threaten manner. I had no other choice to defend myself". Usually unless he dead thats enough reason that they won't take you downtown, espeicailly with witness saying, "He/She told the guy please I don't want to fight".

If you downtown Cord makes some good points, but if you arrested you made some big mistakes. Don't play tough guy as the cops interview you or act beligerant.

I guess that is info you need to know once arrested.


Edited by Neko456 (07/05/07 10:34 AM)
_________________________
DBAckerson

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#349787 - 07/05/07 02:57 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: harlan]
Cord Offline
Prolific

Registered: 01/13/05
Posts: 11399
Loc: Cambridge UK.
Quote:

Cord, can I ask a question? Putting aside the 'bad apples', do you think that the police in every country, and every state are trained to respond and interrogate in a uniform and professional manner?




Aside from individual 'bad apples' (that exist in every walk of life), I think that, whilst the structure and laws of each country change, the motivation of those who wish to uphold the law remains largely benevolent. I dont think that there are swarms of guys carrying a badge looking to victimise the innocent- there are enough criminals to keep them busy without the added hassle of framing the law abiding.
there are miscarriages of justice, some caused by 'bad apples' some just through honest error; and there are police forces with worse records in this respect than others (Thai, mexican other less developed countries are notorious for corruption), so if looking from that perspective/experience then sure its something to consider, but then to be honest; if you are arrested in a country that is not signed up to the bill of human rights, has no restrictions or regulations on prisoner welfare and fair treatment, then you are screwed, and even if you 'beat' the interrogator, they will just fit you up and jail you anyway. Money is the best policy in such situations quite frankly.

my point is, that if you are a law abiding person, who through circumstances beyond your control finds yourself under scrutiny by the police, just be honest and cooperative, why shouldnt this be the natural thing to do, unless you are in fact, hiding something?
_________________________
Don't let the door hit ya' where the good lord split ya'
http://cord.mybrute.com

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#349788 - 07/05/07 03:30 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: Cord]
harlan Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 07/31/04
Posts: 6664
Loc: Amherst, MA
Too many public displays of abuses have many people here, in the USA, wondering if we have been naive. Distrust and uncertainty, intrusions of private space on various levels...even an honest person doesn't want to fall afoul of 'the law'.

Quote:

my point is, that if you are a law abiding person, who through circumstances beyond your control finds yourself under scrutiny by the police, just be honest and cooperative, why shouldnt this be the natural thing to do, unless you are in fact, hiding something?



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#349789 - 07/05/07 06:24 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: harlan]
Cord Offline
Prolific

Registered: 01/13/05
Posts: 11399
Loc: Cambridge UK.
Quote:

Too many public displays of abuses have many people here, in the USA, wondering if we have been naive. Distrust and uncertainty, intrusions of private space on various levels...even an honest person doesn't want to fall afoul of 'the law'.

Quote:

my point is, that if you are a law abiding person, who through circumstances beyond your control finds yourself under scrutiny by the police, just be honest and cooperative, why shouldnt this be the natural thing to do, unless you are in fact, hiding something?







There is an argument that in this day and age, the concept of 'personal privacy' is, quite frankly, not compatible with the times we live in. only this week in the UK we have found to our cost that those who pose the greatest threat to the public come from within the very society that they hate. I would gladly suffer a more invasive society in order to have such people caught more efficiently, providing that any such legislation come with an inbuilt 'safety catch' that allowed for it to be downscaled in line with the threats we face. Freedom is an illusion, we are subject to control in almost every aspect of life, but then, the controls in place are agreed by those we have judged worthy to represent the wishes of the electoral majority. 'The man' is merely the reflection of 'the many'. Travelling on a plane is an invasive process- you are prohibited from carrying certain things seen as mundane in normal life, your property, your person, and your motives are held up for close scrutiny. You must provide identification. Airports are orwellian- no question. Do you think it prudent to drop these measures in the name of 'freedom'? Do you think that those who enforce such safety measures do so to keep you safe, or merely to impose their personal will on you?
Behind every badge is a person. That person is part of society. They have kids, a car with a rusty exhaust, they watch football, enjoy a bud with friends, and cant wait to see the simpsons movie.
Now is not the time to start painting more people in broad bruch strokes of stereotype. All black people are not 'gangsta's', all arabs are not terrorists, and all law enforcement are not corrupt, nor representative of some fascist threat to our lives. These are the people who risk their lives every day to keep you safe.
_________________________
Don't let the door hit ya' where the good lord split ya'
http://cord.mybrute.com

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#349790 - 07/05/07 08:40 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: Cord]
harlan Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 07/31/04
Posts: 6664
Loc: Amherst, MA
Well, that is your opinion. Mine is different, possibly due to the historic differences in our cultures. This is one of those knotty questions over on this side of the pond...how much are we willing to give up in the way of individual privacy and personal rights for the 'good' of the larger society. No one argues it when put that way. But when the 'good' includes the ability to enter one's home without a warrant or proof ('what WMD's?'), where is the line drawn?

Quote:

There is an argument that in this day and age, the concept of 'personal privacy' is, quite frankly, not compatible with the times we live in.




One example of justice: this winter illegal immigrants were rounded up by immigration and held, and then deported. Only...no one was home to pick up their children from schools, or daycares, or go home to feed them. One retarded man, legally here but who didn't have the ability to commicate, is now wandering lost in Mexico. His mother is there trying to find him.

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#349791 - 07/05/07 08:53 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: Cord]
Ed_Morris Offline
Professional Poster

Registered: 11/04/05
Posts: 6772
I realize the drift in conversation, and appologize to the posters in furthering it...

Cord, I hear what you are saying, but the tricky part the US is trying to deal with, is when 'danger' and 'threat level' is perceptively and subconsciously escalated in a calculated manner to further the agendas of those in a position of promoting that perception.

Is the trimming of individual freedoms actually used to protect the public? or are the trimmings used to protect the companies and people in power under the guise of protecting the public?

for instance, how many abuses of wire-tapping have there been by the rich,powerful and corporate VS how many wire-tappings have stopped a terrorist attack?

hard to say - I certainly don't know. ...but my money is on the rich, powerful and corporate using wire-tapping as a tool of their trade VS them seeing it as an illegal/immoral activity.


To try and bring it back on-topic...think of the most effective methods the military has for interrogating prisoners of war. Now imagine if those methods were legally available to your local Police department, even if you were only pulled over for a broken taillight.

Thats the problem...how far do you go? do you treat the public like enemies of war until it's proven otherwise?

Vietnam war - The soldiers didn't know WHO the enemy was...so, just go into a village and interrogate everyone as if ALL were operatives for the VC. Maybe it made sense in that environment, but is it reasonable for civilian police to do the same?
To assume for instance a bunch of teenagers sitting around a table, drinking and talking crap about their government while the police are listening in, and they arrest them as 'enemies of the state' ? given 'enemy combatant' status, sent to Cuba for 'questioning' without lawyer or trial for 6 months while they are treated outside the protection of the Geneva convention? All for the reason of an ambitious law enforcement department looking to 'twart' terrorist activity so they can get awarded more funding from the Federal government....sortof like a 'No Terrorist Left Behind' act.

Is THAT the kind of 'giving up some freedoms' you are referring to?

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#349792 - 07/05/07 10:07 PM Re: Police Interrogation [Re: Ed_Morris]
McSensei Offline
Veteran

Registered: 06/15/05
Posts: 1068
Loc: Kent, England


Bravo Ed, I totally agree with you.
Then again, I'm quite a libertarian myself, so my view on Government is probably more in line with conservative American thinking.
_________________________
http://www.semtexgym.co.uk/

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